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was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an incredibly important generation and our nations history. much of what is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing out forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create up star movements. i think all that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement all that great activism that it produced and all of that we are seeing that directly play out today whether it's the election of barack obama or the continued advancement of women in congress so all that is a direct result of their activis
umbrellas brought to asia. but what has been the norm for generations is now starting to change. perhaps the catalyst of this change is the perception, either rightly or wrongly, that the balance of power in asia is undergoing a once in a lifetime transformation. what we are seeing is that asia's collective attention is gradually shifting away from economic prosperity to, instead, security concerns. where nations used to focus on trade and commerce, now they discuss nationalism, military budgets and even provocative behavior. look no further than the territorial dispute in the east china sea. for these reasons, we must shift away from the old approach, which unnecessarily divided the region and separated economic engagement from our political engagement. the old way of doing business is not only cumbersome, but it is becoming less relevant. tomust somehow find a way reinvigorate our engagement of asia, not for fear that we may be left out, but rather we must engage so that we can once again move the focus squarely back to economic prosperity. this notable shift and focus in trade to nati
for his beliefs. their beliefs may have changed over the years, but not terribly much, and they're still fighting for them, and i think that's inspiring. >> thanks a million. >> thank you. thank you very much. [applause] >> up next, after words with guest host, s.e. cupp. this week, david burstein, and his book, "fast future: how the millenial generation is shaping our world. "o'he argues those between 18 and 30 years of age are more ethnically diverse and digitally tuned in an others and millenials are more influence shall and a fast moving, more integrated world. the program lasts about an hour. >> david, you're a millenial, writing about millenials. how old are you? >> guest: i'm 24. >> host: give me your background. where kid did you grow up? >> guest: i grew up in western connecticut, an hour out of new york city, and as a student in high school i started the film festival for high school students in which we saw great films about young people, issues about bullying and teen south s, this is in 2003, way before being part of the national conversation, and seeing the power of film i
with the bartender who changed political history. tonight, the footage you haven't seen including the heroic act that convinced scott prody he needed to release the tape. >> looking back on it, it's one of the proudest moments of my life. >>> they're refighting the vietnam war over at cpac. >> vietnam was winnable, but people in washington decided we would not win it. >>> howard fineman has a wrap-up of the conservative conclave. >>> plus more republican obstruction of appointees has democrats fuming. i'll ask former senator tom daschle if harry reid needs to revisit the filibuster reform. >>> and yesterday it was the president. now democratic leadership looks like they may cave on social security. i'll ask the big congressional panel where they stand. >>> good to have you with us, folks, thanks for watching. people around the country are still buzzing about the man behind the 47% video who revealed his identity on this show last night. now, today the world is getting to know the real scott prody. he described himself on this program as a regular guy. he's got bills to pay, he struggles in the m
poverty, it didn't provide a way to change ghettoization, it didn't reach the full goals that the participants in the civil rights movement were really aspiring to of freedom, of power. and so what you had in the starting really in '66 it became a very big call was a question, black power. how do we build black power? there were dozens of organizations in most major cities asking this question and trying to thub it. think about it. there were a lot of different kinds of approaches. one important kind of theoretical answer to this was to say we're not just going to, you know, it's not that we just want to be part of america. america as it's constituted is an imperial power, and we need to challenge that imperialism as part and parcel of the colonial struggle not only in africa, but nationally. so there were organizations in the bay area asking that question on a small scale. one organization called the rove louis their action movement, both bobby seale and huey newton participated and drew a number of ideas from there, but there were different kinds of answers, right? and
trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit ♪ ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> welcome back everyone. here are the stories making news around the world right now. >> in the central africa republic, the president was forced to flee his own country. rebels seized the capital. the president is
come later and try to change hearts and minds. >> there was an interesting poll that just came out. it was a daily newspaper there. they found 38% believe he is hostile to israel. 14% think he is indifferent. only one-third believe that he is supportive. i wonder what you think is the strategy there? is it sort of like in the united states, if he can't get something through congress he goes directly to the people? >> i think that'll be part of it. the situation in israel sort of represents one of the fundamental miscalculations of the obama presidency, which was that when he came into office he thought, and a lot of his advisers thought, they'd be able to make a dent there by sheer force of will and personality and by being kind of this unifying figure. and, of course, diplomacy is more complicated than that. and the peace process there has been stalled for years. so i think that the reason they're lowering expectations is because they don't expect that much to happen on this trip. i think he is going there more as a box checking exercise than hoping to make any kind of serious str
, especially with social justice and wanting the kind of change that will be better for society. i am delighted to be here at cooper union and i am delighted of the sponsorship of n.y.u. which i am very familiar with so i feel at home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact you braved the weather and the elements for three yesterday was so beautiful. what happened today? this is new york but it can change so dramatically and so quickly. i feel very at home because i have an early experience of learning about human rights. very early. growing up in the west of ireland wedged between two brothers and older and two brothers younger i had to be interested in equality and human rights but using my elbows to assert myself but as i try to explain in the book but that was not the norm but growing up in ireland where girls and women knew their place in the home or as a 90 or possibly to become a writer or a artist or a musician. i was very aware this you seem to have much more options even though my parent's repeated i had the same opportunities that my brothers had and they would support me in t
: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 45, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: move to reconsider. mr. mccain: move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent to speak up to two minutes and after my remarks the senior senator from arizona be recognized. the presiding officer: is there objection? is there objection to the modified request? without objection. mr. brown: madam president, thank you. i want to not yet call up, i've been working with chairwoman mikulski on this until they get an agreement but i'll just discuss for a moment amendment 83 i'm cosponsoring with senator isakson of georgia. it really does help us restore as chairmanwoman mikulski has been working towards, regular order in this chamber. this is an amendment having to do with some chang dealing -- language de
that somebody has to be their friend, i suppose you can force the child to say this is my friend, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that's it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> it's like saying you can vote, you can travel, but you cannot be a citizen. there are certain labels in this country that are critical. you could have said in the loving case, you can't get married, but you can have an interracial union. everyone would know that was wrong. >> john roberts and ted olson arguing about whether this "marriage" label means something, or if you can have first-class citizenship while the state still bans you from having that label, that one thing. if you wanted to know today if there was any good old fashioned homophobic ignorance in the court, yes, there was, on the wings of a dove named antonin scalia. he was trying to help out the lawyer arguing the anti gay rights side. he starts out trying to help the lawyer and goes right off the cliff. >
. then he changed it to paths of prosperity. that's the one he stuck with today. well to paraphrase shakespeare a ryan budget by any other name would still smell unsweet. it would eliminate most of obama-care, it would repeal financial regulation, and it would make major cuts to medicare. sounds great. here he is trying to convince americans that they want this tired 'ol lemon of a plan. >> it's a path to prosperity, a responsible balanced budget. we believe we owe the american people a balanced budget. for the third straight year we've delivered. >> michael: congressman, what you owe the american people is respect. they're smart enough to understand that you introduced the exact same budget during the election and you lost. jay carney today said that the president wants to trim medicare but with a scalpel not an axe. and ryan let slip his real plan for medicare system. >> this to us is something that we're not going to give up on because we're not going to give up on destroying the healthcare system for the american people. >> michael: that was bushan it was so man. was it a freudi
of their dollars when poor people are paying a disproportionate amount. so david throw said things don't change, we do. there's going to have to be some changes going on with individuals and their philosophies if we're going to bring this nation around to propelling this growth or we're going to fall down again because they are not going to move. >> when you look at the fact that speaker boehner wrote and this is an op-ed that says, obama's outreach is nice but where's the leadership? if we're going to find bipartisan solutions, the president will have to move beyond the same proposals as democrat democratic dogma. aren't they saying, there can be an agreement as long as everybody agrees with me? >> yes, he is. but he's trying to do other things with these kinds of press conferences and op-eds. by the way, you spent plenty of time with the president. i have, too. saying he's not a leadership is going to get under your skin. that's a cheap shot. he doesn't care. he knows who he is and he's the president of the united states. john boehner knows very well indeed and all of the republican leaders know
the deficit? paul ryan says no. >> at least budgets are passing around here for a change. the government's going to have to learn to do more with less, it's not the government's money, it's the people's money. >> the senate democrats are considering a number of balances ever-- >> and house committee chair paul ryan telling us republicans and democrats are still world's apart. well, that is an understatement. we saw that just an hour ago. the democratic-led senate defeating the ryan house budget 40-59. so is there any hope left? here is congressman paul ryan. >> great to see you. >> great it to see you again. >> greta: i want to talk about the budget that passed today, i imagine you're happy. >> we're very happy. we passed a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the necessary means to a healthier economy, it creates more jobs and helps people keep more of hard earned money and a contrast to the other budgets that are passing. at least budgets are passing here for a change,
points. the brief is incoherent. no one could tell that the go standard it can change. two, the brief was profoundly misguided would damage the list for schoolchildren. there is no need to file the brief because the civil rights division are to have implement tenet standard for more than a decade. he did not notice only one of these three initially and consistent points could be right. though all three might be wrong. at the end of the meeting, my recommendation was not to file. i'd written a brief and i acquitted myself, but i can't know conker should be given to the violent. solicitor general bork also recommended not filing. that cost him a lot. he knew this would be his last chance for influence in a subject you care deeply about. but if that discouraging defiance was more important and attorney general bv agreed to solicitor general bork. this one in my hand may be the only copy though perhaps al gore cannot really be retained copies for their files, too. i'm sure earlier tests photocopied by the civil rights division for the benefit of the price lawyers. that group made a stiff
, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to today and make your business dream a reality. at we put the law on your side. >>> at the top of the show, we asked you why you are awake? dan, what do you have? >> a couple of tweets. i'm awake from my daily vocabulary lesson. thanks for explaining the word crater. >> i'm here to educate everyone. >> i'm up to see what tie you chose today. come on, bill, you can do better. >> i know. i chickened out. i had one, it was a little more risque, tomorrow i'll go bold. all r
. airports are arguing the agency violated a federal law meant to stop major changes that will hurt airport safety. the faa says they can not comment on pending litigation. >>> new at 7:00, a 49er talks for the first time in a national story about being gay in the nfl. noah walker is live and says it took time for harris to address the truth after it first came out? >> reporter: gasia, in this city, being gay and being out about it does not get a shrug but an nfl player? >> reporter: former san francisco 49er told cnn what most assumed after he was charged with assaulting his boyfriend last august. why say it out loud so publicly now? >> i want people to know, if they are gay athletes or athletes still in the the chooseet or youth who are not quite sure what their sexuality is to realize that not only is that not unique but those feelings are common feelings. >> reporter: if they are common feelings on the football field, they are not commonly discussed. the 6'7, 329 linebacker played five seasons with the 49ers one with the raiders knowing he was gay and keeping it secret. the lastclose
another prime example. if we were to do those things, it would change the psyche in congress, get people more courage and get us closer to doing things you've written about over the years. >>> we want to mark another important anniversary. and officials say, it has news to go with it. at least 56 people were killed this morning in explosions across iraq. that's exactly ten years after then president bush announced the u.s. invasion. most of today's attacks were car bombings around baghdad, including one near major government offices and foreign embassies. we're still getting information in on that in terms of casualties and injuries. elizabeth, you first, ten years later, where are we? well, it's a very difficult anniversary. no one remembers this fondly at all. the iraqis certainly don't remember this well. they're not marking this anniversary at all. i also think that the war changed fundamentally the way the united states thinks about war. look at how reluctant the president is right now to intervene in syria in a serious way. look at how reluctant the pentagon was to go to war to int
.m. eastern. that is an hour later than usual due to the time change. you can also watch it sunday nights at 9:00 eastern and pacific on c-span. >> tomorrow on c-span, the senior advocacy group will talk about benefit and how changes in cost of living may affect social security recipients including veterans. americans with disabilities and people with very long incomes. live coverage begins at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. and also live, a little later at noon eastern, the czech republic former two-term president talks about the european debt crisis. he is speaking at the cato institute. >> next, the funeral of venezuelan president hugo chavez. he died from cancer this week at age 58 after 14 years in power. according to venezuelan officials, his body will be embalmed on put on display permanently. interim president nicolas maduro and jesse jackson jr. spoke at the funeral in caracas. this is 45 minutes. >> let us join hands. bow our heads in prayer. i want to thank the family for allowing us to say a prayer on this holy occasion. today we are here, not because hugo chavez has died, but b
election after election. third, we must embrace the changing demographics of america, not by diluting our principles, but by reaching out to all americans. if there are those in the republican party who cannot subscribe to the principles, let them go their way. >> we should reach out to everybody, but if you don't agree with what i say get! are you sure you're going to reach out to all? >> american way means we don't take hard-earned money from your family's pocket to provide a better standard of living to those who are no willing to work. cenk: yeah! let's reach out except those bums, i don't want them anywhere near us. bold new ideas by the republicans. let's bring in joe williams, the deputy chief of the boston globe's washington bureau. excellent guest on "the young turks." joe, how are you my friend? >> good to see you again cenk. cenk: great to see you. let me give you more fresh ideas. i'm going to play a clip from marco rubio and let's see all the wonderful new ideas they have here. >> what i sense from a lot of people i've talked to is this fear that somehow america has changed,
party, hubert humphry had no idea how to end the war. when you needed was total change at the white house. the democrats had to go to nixon could come in and end vietnam. but then less than a week before the election, it all went horribly wrong for richard nixon, because less than a week before election, on halloween night, 1968, the democratic president, lbj, went on tv in a surprise nationally televised address. he made a surprise announcement that peace was at hand. the communist side, the vietnamese side was going to be make concessions at peace talks. the south vietnamese were going to agree to a deal. peace was at hand. the terms were all set. peace was at hand. in recognition of the fact that peace was about to be declared, the united states would step back right away and stop all military operations in vehement. lbj said that on thursday night. the election was going to be tuesday. turns out the democrats know how to end this war. that was bad news for richard nixon, but good news for the country who wanted the war to be over. good news for the people fighting the war. this
the cypress government changed its mind. the central bank here as well as the finance minister decided to open all the banks on thursday rather than staggering with some openings on tuesday. by that time, lou, people will be without banks on this island nation for 12 full days. they were told to keep calm, but that could be difficult. lou: i'm sure it is difficult, and difficult as well, days ago, we heard they had just a few days of food supplies, grocery stores were running short of food stocks for the shelf. what is that situation? is there now food in this bailout that will make that -- going to decrease the food problem? >> the supplies here okay, lou. gas was short because people were hording. what they are running short on is cash. right now, the atms are limited to 100 euros, that's $130 per day, and that is a big problem for the folks here, and one more point is people forget that a lot of people do their banking online. again, for 12 days, the folks here have not been able to do any kind of online banking, any kind of electronic transfers, using the banking system..3 i spoke to one e
powerful than millions of voices calling for change. those voices are a silent majority that needs to be vocal and need to be galvanized and organized. i think the votes can be there for a ban on illegal trafficking, the instance you described earlier involving ebel that killed the correction officer in colorado and killed another person on his way to shooting the police officer who tried to apprehend him. classic straw purchase and should be banned. background checks to prevent him from having weapons, deranged people like adam lanza from having access. the sheer volume of bullets and ammunition and rounds in that war arsenal is absolutely stunning. we need to make sure that we keep those ammunition and firearms out of the hands of dangerous people. school safety and mental health issues, those core provisions i think have a lot of support. we need americans to remind my colleagues in the senate their voices have to be heard. >> it struck me today that we've been chronicling on this show the relentless political activism on this issue. the beltway common wisdom implies people will
, was to cause trouble for yourself. even when a whole new vocabulary, wmd, homeland, regime change, freedom fries, coalition of the willing, was being confected and infiltrated into our national dialogue. the mainstream media was useless. even when the culture of the country i.t. itself, country music was drafted into service with twisting appeals to vengeance for 9/11. remember how you felt? no wonder cheney's arrogant to this guy. no wonder bush is effectively clueless. no wander the war hawks are shameless. all of them together got away with it. it was the people of silence. the newspaper editors. the network executives. the mostly respected columnists who know what they did and did not do who are wrestling now not with the history of the american invasion of iraq, we're all doing that, but their own history in doing nothing to ask the hard questions. persisting again and again with that hardest question of all. why? it had to be answered. was it being answered in principle and the language consistent with our american traditions? no. we're joined right now by nbc's great investigative c
think very revealing window into how the country has changed. >> jeffrey toobin, thank you so much. these two cases are going before the supreme court at a time when public support for same-sex marriage continues to grow. recent polls show that's the case, but maybe the most striking number of concerns how many americas count gays and lesbians as close members of their circles these days, the higher visibility of gay power in hollywood has not exactly hurt that cause. >> knock knock, anybody homo? >> i am, i am. >> it's just a tv show, a situation comedy, not even a drama. >> tonight at dinner i'll tell my mother i'm gay. >> vice president biden has credited "will & grace" with changing americans' attitudes about same-sex marriage. >> i think will & grace probably did more to educate the american public than anything anybody's done so far. >> on this, supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage agree, hollywood has been influential of encouraging acceptance of gays and lesbians. it was through the medium of television that millions of americans first had open gays and lesbians in
on your bill making many changes at my request. they have made the bill better and reduced the negative side effects of previous versions. i trust you think so as well because you have included the changes in the new bill. the new bill in your substitute amendment also included a revised bill by senators gillibrand and kirk on the subject of gun trafficking. those revisions also reflect changes that i asked senator gillibrand to make, and i think it would be worthwhile to outline all the changes that have been made to the bill since they were first introduced. i think they demonstrate good faith of the chairman and senator gillibrand. for instance, senator gillibrand's bill originally would have made it a federal crime to transfer two or more guns if that person knew that the result would be a violation of state or local law. that would have given states and localities a one-way incentive to address new gun control measures and force the cost of prosecution and incarceration on the federal government. it also would have created for the first time a situation in which violation of state
years. ( rooster crows % of cn e maourished. the potential changes brought by economic development are enormous. the soil here is rich and fertile. laos remains a largely agrarian society. lowland peoples practice wet rice farming. the capital, vientiane, has a population of just half a million. the rest of the 5½ million laotians are spread over 155 million square miles of land. it'she seconlowestpulaon da aand the least urbanized country squin the region.and. around laos lie the developing economies of thailand, china, vietnam and cambodia. the north of laos is almos entirely mountains, covering 70% of the country. much of its western border is defined by the mekong river, a tural barrier to trade. the friendship bridge breached that barrier. narrator: somphavan inthavong is in the power business. he was an engineer on the first hydroelectric scheme built here in 1951. to him, these rugged mountains and flowing waters are a pot of gold. laos produces far more electricity than it can use. the surplus, approximately 80% of the power generated, is sold to thailand at a profit. the
finished the commission report that recommend to congress that they change that law now retirees can have their benefits cut if this goes through congress, so i think everybody needs to start making some phone calls. host: all right our last phone call. up next we will talk to congressman steve pearce about his outreach to minorities, women and young voters and then we will turn our attention to capitol hill with earl. we'll be right back. >> 34 years ago fay we began providing access to the kong and federal government. the c-span networks created by america's cable companies in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your cable providers. >> and we can take pictures with m.r.i. or upset scans or c.t. scans and see the whole thing but there's an enormous gap about how the circuits function in the brain as to how i am able to move my hand or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be technology invented or nano technology. but we need to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same tim
accounts for just 2% of the market and blackberry is determined to change that. >> we are used to competition now. we have to innovate and get better. that's why we launched this platform. avilanching in europe, blackberry 10 is now in the u.s. >> the z10 looks an awful lot like its touch screen competitors and it's getting good reviews. >> i like it. i think they have done good job with certain aspects of the phone. it feels comfortable in the hands and they have done a nice job with the camera. >> she was enthusiastic about the touch keyboard and camera and the online store full of appears. k -- aps. because who wants a phone without angry birds? the latest blackberry has all the trappings of a modern smartphone. >> the question remains is a simple one. is it enough to save the company? >> right now i think they are just trying to prove that they are not dead. >> are they? >> they aren't dead yet. >> blackberry has no shortage of former users. >> my old blackberry wouldn't work in my own house, where this phone does. >> what would it take for blackberry to win you back? >> i
-americans and very frustrated at the slow pace of change and civil rights change particularly in urban areas in the north and west dr. king disparate in late 1967 that he thought the united states was moving quickly towards a fascist, towards fascism, towards a fascist state but the inevitable response the violence that is occurring both by the police and the right into the signal from the symbolism of vietnam was that we are quickly turning towards fascism. and so in december of 1967 he announces the poor people's campaign in which his organization would bring waves of the nation's poor and disinherited to washington, d.c. to demand for the redress of the grievances by the government to secure the jobs and income for all adding that the poor would stay on till america responds. but he envisioned this campaign has not just black and white but one that included mexican-americans, puerto ricans and native americans as well and he had hoped the campaign would do the number of things, three primary goals. transform the struggle of human-rights, bring about the federal government's re-dedication
't seem to be worried. at least they isn't through the day of october 5th. that changed overnight on the 5th and the 6th and i heard from a pretty well plugged in person in the policy part of this, is that the israelis would know if there was going to be a war because they had great intelligence and they had a source high up in egypt, and they didn't -- i didn't know who it was at that time. israelys have now said -- not total yunnan him inity on this but the people i take seriously say they recruited a very high-ranking egyptian, he happened to be former president nassar's son-in-law, which makes it even more interesting, and that they were quite sure that if this was for real, they would hear from him, which they did, on october 4th he demanded a meeting in london with their military intelligence. military intelligence flew to london. was debriefed by him. went back to israel, reported to the prime minister, and that's what changed their perception so that the next day, we got the message from golda meir, there is going to be war and it's going to happen by the end of they today. and tha
? >> today? nine, your honor. >> nine. and so there has been this sea change between now and 1996. >> reporter: but the court's liberals sharply questioned doma saying the federal benefits denied legally married same-sex couples have a profound effect. >> they touch evy aspect of life. your partner is sick. social security, i mean, it's pervasive. the full marriage and then this sort of skim milk marriage. >> reporter: justice kennedy, potentially the pivotal vote, said the states -- not congress -- traditionally define what it means to be married and eligible for federal benefits. >> you are at real risk of running in conflict with what has always been thought to be the essence of the state police power which is to regulate marriage, divorce, custody. >> reporter: and several justices said congress was improperly discriminating when it passed the law. >> i'm going to quote from the house report here is that congress decided to reflect and honor a collective moral judgment and to express moral disapproval of homosexuality. >> reporter: for justice kennedy, the probable fifth vote
of california to discuss his career in hollywood, marriage equality, climate change, immigration reform, gun rights, and violent movies,, as well as why he chose not to run for governor against arnold schwarzenegger in 2006. this is an hour and 10 minutes. >> good afternoon and welcome to today's meeting of the commonwealth club of california. the place where you are in the know. you can find us on the internet at im a news anchor for abc 77 television in san francisco and a member of the commonwealth club board of directors and your moderator for today's program. it is now my letter to introduce our distinguished speaker today, rob reiner. [applause] >> thank you. >> from his starring role as meathead on the popular 1970 -- >> you are the first person to call me that today. [laughter] >> it is still early. >> true. >> on that wonderful program " on the family" to his blockbuster films. when you look at at his list of films, it is remarkable. "the princess bride," "when harry met sally," "a few good men." as a director, he has worked with a-list actors, jack nicholson,
reasons for our health care costs keep going up because we have not changed the way patients and doctors see each other. we must be innovative and creative in tackling the traditional costs of health care. as a representative representing silicon valley, i have helped lead the way in this by promoting innovative technologies such as telemedicine, personal health connective devices and other tools. i will be reintroducing the health care innovation and marketplace technologies act later this year to continue this effort, and let's hope folks on the other side will understand its importance. most importantly, however, i will continue to stand with my friends here in the chamber tonight to protect medicare and the medicare guarantee. we can fix our nation's fiscal house by being innovative rather than using the same old ideology. we can improve our nation's standing by being courageous and standing by our nation's seniors. i want to thank you and i yield ack. mr. bera: i thank my dear friend and colleague, congressman honda, from california. the reason why we are speaking on the floor today
, but it changes the definition of what it means to be a friend. and that, it seems to me what supporters of proposition 8 are saying here. all you're interested in is the label and you insist on changing the definition of the label. >> that is the voice of chief justice john roberts there. >> if you're over the age of 55, you don't help us serve the government's interest and regulate through marriage so why is that different? >> your honor, even with respect to couples over the age of 55, it is very rare that both parties to the couple are infertile and the traditional. >> no, because if a couple -- i can just assure you if both the woman and the man are over the age of 55, there are not a lot of children coming out of that marriage. >> that's elena kagan right there. jonathan capehart, how old were you? seriously? >> no. move on. >> no. this is good. this is a fair question. >> not over 50. >> jonathan, let's start our conversation with you. it's always a treat to listen into the supreme court. we don't get to hear that very often. what did you take away from what you heard yesterday? >
polarized our nation and threatened our ability to address serious problems. that, they say, is a change. >> by and large, it is really becoming harder and harder to govern as a result of the extraordinary -- of the legislative process in this country, and especially in washington. >> analysts point to a series of reasons. the rise of cable tv and talk radio with an ideological slant. the permanent campaigns. all of that have had an impact. >> how often do john boehner and nancy losey talk> -- nancy pelosi talk? i suspect not for much. we talk all the time. >> in the first term, we would advocate for the exact pieces of legislation that republicans have offered. they would quietly say to me, it is politics. >> if i were going to make suggestions to the leaders -- find a way to have more communication. it would make a huge difference. >> in the country outside of washington, there is a real contingent to move forward on a host of issues. >> can anything be done about it? let's hope so. >> senator daschle, let's start with you. we heard that there was a red phone on your desk and on his de
. we've all changed, our kids have changed. much better to get your kids up off the couch than painting coca-cola and other soft drinks what they're not. they're not the poison. but if you sit on your couch all day and you eat and you don't do anything, then, yes, it's going to have a negative impact. >> actually, i just have to counter. >> don't overspeak on these things we've all been eating for 50 years and we don't need -- you know what, i would much rather mike bloomberg -- he's got power over the schools, why doesn't he force schools to have hour long p.e. and run them hard. run the kids hard. >> because these foods actually are toxic, the way they are made, if i may finish, i contend that you're making an incorrect statement by saying these things aren't poison. >> they're not poison. >> they are. when you have such high concentrations of sugar and high fructose corn syrup and salt and fats in foods. >> hold on, keep the camera right here. she's talking this is important. go ahead, i'm sorry. >> they create an addictive -- >> oh, man. >> this was not set up. >> and i bet you can'
successful in getting elected, governor ronald reagan, governor george w. bush. politics changes and the question is people are going to be looking at republican nominees from the perspective do they have the ability to lead the country. are they a leader? some of them bike bobby jindal or mickey haley or martinez of new mexico or john kasich or governor snyder, all these people may be able to emphasize their experience but also marco rubio, you mentioned. rand paul is going may be a candidate. i think at some point for the top spot but the second part, senator from new hampshire and governor chris christie, if he gets re-elected is going to be a player if he wants to be a player. >> greta: do you see a bigger role for the people that identify themselves as tea party candidates or do you think that freshly in light of the recent rnc report certain things like suggesting perhaps fewer debates which may be more difficult for less well known candidate. what do you see looking into the future? >> a dozen debates is going to be adequate for anybody to get known. 22 hurt the republican
hail. this bright banding that you see here is going to change over to sleet and then snow. columbus you're looking at at least 6 to 10 inches. your warnings continue until the afternoon. pittsburgh, 4 to 6. thousands of schools will be closed here, but as the energy gets transferred to this other one, i want to show you in the higher terrain above 1,500 feet, maybe in the panhandle of west virginia, western maryland, easily over a foot of snow, but the thousands that live in washington will most likely have to go to work again, kind of like the last storm. schools may not be closed, rainfall trying to change over, bursts of snow from time to time, but i really think just some slush in the morning commute. new york city looks like 2 to 3 inches. starts as rain mainly and changing in the morning hours. i think the morning rush is fine. it will continue to snow into the evening period, but atlantic city, this is where we'll find a coastal storm. not going to be a nor'easter, don, which is good news. continues to move and shove its way out into the atlantic, but one year ago it was 80 i
. the story keeps changing. so i'm not listening... to anyone but myself. i know better nutrition when i seet: great grains. great grains cereal stts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more processed flakes look nothing like natural grains. you can't argue th nutrition you can see. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. to help support a healthy tabolism try new great grains protein blend in cinnamon hazelnut orhone. i had[ designer ]eeling enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer through 6 months. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events, including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you
to change that. then we have got this new poll just to add to the mix about how working moms are doing. they find it more difficult to balance home and family than the dads do. bill: huge challenges out there for them. martha: yes. bill: we'll catch -- and for you. [laughter] have a good day. martha: see you tomorrow, everybody. jon: and right now brand new stories and breaking news. jenna: new concerns about safety in the skies after we're told a rage suspect gets through security screening with a stun gun. this happening as the head of the tsa goes before lawmakers to defend his plan to allow small knives back on planes. more on that in a moment. >>> plus, new trouble for another carnival cruise liner. reports that the carnival dream is turning into a nightmare. the ship apparently stuck in the caribbean right now. the stories we're hearing from passengers that at this time, jon, sound all too familiar. and we're going to talk with senator john mccain moments from now as he marks 40 years since his release from a vietnamese prison camp. his reflections, his thoughts 40 years later. i
a global coalition to bring about change. but that doesn't mean that suddenly you're mother theresa, that you're saintly, that, you know, you can answer anything in the world by virtue of this wisdom that falls upon you with the peace price, that's absurd. >> who picks it? >> it's a committee of five in norway. i think their term in office or whatever is about five years and they can serve on the committee two terms in a row. those phi people plus the secretary of the nobel committee there. there are nominations made every year, at the beginning of the year, they have to be in by february 1. then the committee meets, i think five times in the year rm i learned these things after i met the committee, of course. and i liked the ones that, you know, i met. then they meet about five times a year. and the first meeting is to just discard all the ridiculous nominations. some truly are absurd. then they start to narrow it down to nominations that they think have some merit and they hand them out to researchers. >> who nominated you? >> lots of people. we found out after the fact, one perso
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